Stop the Puget Sound Gateway Boondoggle

More and more of us are moving off the roads. Yet, across the country there are countless proposed highway projects, like the Puget Sound Gateway, that are not just expensive — they’re outright boondoggles. We need your help to stop it. 

It's time to shift Washington’s transportation priorities

These days, more and more of us are moving off the roads. Across the country, and here in Washington, people are driving less on average than we have in years past. Driving peaked in America in 2007. Since then, the Millennial Generation has led the way, with more people walking, biking and taking transit. In fact, in 2014 more people rode public transportation than had in 57 years! Meanwhile, new technologies and other options, such as bike sharing, are making it easier for people to rely less on cars.

Yet, despite these well-documented changes in transportation trends, our decision makers continue to prioritize new roads and wasteful highway expansions. Meanwhile, other needs — from expanding public transportation to critical bridge repairs — go unmet. At a time when one in nine bridges in America are considered “structurally deficient,” these confused priorities put millions of Americans in danger every single day. 

The Puget Sound Gateway Boondoggle

In Washington, the state government is proposing to spend between 2.8 and 3 billion dollars on a wasteful highway expansion that connects State Routes 509 and 167 and Interstate 5, collectively known as the Puget Sound Gateway project. The plan includes adding up to 2 additional lanes of travel in each direction along both state routes, and additional 1-2 lanes of tolling along all three routes.

This unnecessary and wasteful expansion is based on designs first conceived of more than 60 years ago. This, at a time when the state has declared driving is likely to stagnate for decades. What’s more, according to the state’s own data, toll revenue would only account for a small part of the total cost of completed construction. 

While supporters claim the project is necessary to better connect the state’s ports with its highways, there are far more effective ways to invest our transportation dollars. 

Ultimately, there are more pressing and sustainable transportation issues that limited state funds should be spent on instead – such as the 372 structurally deficient bridges in the state. Moreover, investments in the bus system, light rail in Seattle, and high-speed rail between Spokane and Seattle could create a higher quality of living for everyone. 

Moving Washington forward 

We need your help. Tell the governor to invest in sustainable alternatives and already existing infrastructure rather than waste up to 3 billion dollars in needless highway expansion. We deserve to have a safe, reliable transportation system that offers real options for however people might want to get around. Stopping this highway boondoggles is an important first step for getting us there.

Issue updates

Report | WashPIRG Foundation | Budget

Following the Money 2018

One of our primary causes throughout the decades has been holding government officials accountable for responsible stewardship of our tax dollars. To that end, WashPIRG Foundation released its annual "Following the Money" report, which ranks each state on the transparency of its government spending database website.

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Blog Post | Financial Reform

Over 80 Groups Oppose S.2155 & its Benefits for the Credit Bureaus | Mike Litt

Today, we sent a letter addressed to all members of the House of Represenatives in opposition to S. 2155, or as we call it, the Bank Lobbyist Act. We are joined by 84 other groups and leaders, representing communities, consumers, servicemember, and workers across the country. In particular, this letter explains how the bill benefits Equifax and the other national credit bureaus at the expense of average consumers and our military servciemembers. 

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News Release | Public Health

Landmark victory: EU bans bee-killing pesticides

In a historic vote today, the European Union (EU) passed a continent-wide restriction on the use of bee-harming pesticides. U.S. states should pass similar bans to protect our bees and our food.

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Blog Post | Public Health

Home remodeling shouldn’t be a deadly project: Toxic paint removers being sold by Lowe’s and other stores | Dev Gowda

No one should lose a loved one to deadly chemicals. But right now you can walk into Lowe’s and other stores and buy paint removers containing highly toxic chemicals.

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News Release | U.S. PIRG | Consumer Protection

FCC NET NEUTRALITY ORDER PROTECTS THE OPEN INTERNET

Today the FCC took not one but two critical actions to make sure that the Internet works for everybody. First, it issued a "Net Neutrality" order guaranteeing a free and open Internet. This Internet freedom order will prevent the phone and cable companies from granting fast lanes or other preferences to already powerful firms. The FCC also acted to override state laws that prevented local governments from building out broadband networks to compete with the phone and cable companies.

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News Release | WashPIRG Foundation | Democracy

Big Money Playing an Outsized Role in Washington Elections

In Washington’s congressional primaries, bigger wallets give a small set of mega-donors an outsized voice, according to new information released today by the WashPIRG Foundation and Demos. Just 259 donors who gave $1,000 or more to candidates in the primaries outspent the at least 6,233 small donors who gave less than $200, and 57% percent of all candidate contributions came from donors giving chunks of $1,000 or more.

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News Release | WashPIRG Foundation | Transportation

New Report Shows Mounting Evidence of Millennials’ Shift Away from Driving

A new report from the WashPIRG Foundation and the Frontier Group shows mounting evidence that the Millennial generation’s dramatic shift away from driving is likely to continue even as the economy improves.

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News Release | U.S. PIRG | Public Health

Some Good, Some Bad in Obama Executive Order on Protecting Antibiotics

Today, President Barack Obama issued an Executive Order – Combating Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria. While the order takes several important steps necessary to control the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, it misses the opportunity to call for critical reforms in the agricultural sector that are essential to protect public health.

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News Release | WashPIRG Foundation | Transportation

New Study: Traffic Data Does Not Support Spending on Alaskan Way Viaduct Tunnel

A new report by the WashPIRG Foundation calls the proposed Alaskan Way Viaduct tunnel one of 11 examples of wasteful highway spending based on outdated assumptions of ever-increasing driving. The study points to data showing that the financial risks of boring a massive tunnel to replace the damaged and unstable Viaduct hugely outweigh potential benefits. The study calls for the state to consider reprioritizing scarce transportation dollars to other options, including a cheaper combination of surface street and transit options to replace the old earthquake-damaged highway.

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Blog Post | Public Health

US Senate Passes Flawed Chemical Policy Legislation | Bruce Speight

On December 17, 2015, the U.S. Senate passed a flawed bill to update the federal chemical safety law, the 1976 Toxics Substance Control Act (TSCA), unanimously approved on a voice vote. The current TSCA law is notoriously ineffective, and we need real reform to protect public health from toxic chemicals. While improved from their original versions, neither the House nor Senate bill is strong enough, and both bills contain some dangerous flaws.

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Blog Post | Public Health, Food

It keeps getting better | Steve Blackledge

By next summer, all of the chicken served on Papa John's pizzas and poppers will be raised without antibiotics. The pizza chain's announcement adds them to a growing list of restaurants that are helping to stop the overuse antibiotics on large industrial farms.

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Blog Post | Public Health, Food

Predictable Problems in the FDA Annual Report | Bill Wenzel

Not only did the FDA’s voluntary Guidance for Industry #213 not lower the sale and use of antibiotics for food-producing animals, these sales actually increased 4%.

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Blog Post | Financial Reform

House Committee Launches Trojan Horse Assault On State Privacy Laws | Ed Mierzwinski

This afternoon (Tuesday, 8 December), the U.S. House Financial Services Committee launches a massive attack on state privacy laws. Hidden inside a seemingly modest proposal to establish federal data breach notice requirements is a Trojan Horse provision designed to to take state consumer cops off the privacy beat, completely and forever. That's wrong, because the states have always been key first responders and leaders on privacy threats that Congress has ignored, from credit report accuracy and identity theft to data breaches and do-not-call lists.

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Blog Post | Public Health

The Phantom, and Other Menaces | Anya Vanecek

In the midst of warnings that the post-antibiotic era is quickly approaching, we see evidence that it has already arrived.

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News Release | U.S. PIRG Education Fund and Frontier Group

More than one-third of U.S. states are failing to make critical information about how governments are subsidizing business projects with taxpayer dollars readily available to the public online, according to a new report from U.S. PIRG Education Fund and Frontier Group. Following the Money 2019, the organization’s tenth evaluation of online government spending transparency, gives 17 states a failing grade, while only four states received a grade of “B” or higher.

Report | WashPIRG Foundation and Frontier Group

Our 10th report on government spending transparency rates all 50 states on the degree to which they make information about corporate tax breaks and other subsidies available online.

News Release | U.S. PIRG Education Fund

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) announced today that discount stores T.J. Maxx, Marshalls and HomeGoods sold 19 different recalled products to consumers between 2014 and 2019. In the case of five products, the stores’ parent company TJX initiated the recall. The products included the Rock ‘N Play and Kids II inclined infant sleepers, which are responsible for a number of fatalities, rattles that can break and pose a choking hazard, and electronics that overheat or explode. 

Blog Post

Get ready for some alarming stories—and they're all the more alarming because they're true.

On Nov. 14, U.S. PIRG and the Antibiotic Resistance Action Center (ARAC) of George Washington University launched "Superbugs Unplugged," a podcast that will dive into the alarming issue of antibiotic resistance and how we can slow it. Matt Wellington, our Stop the Overuse of Antibiotics campaign director, is co-hosting the podcast, along with Dr. Lance Price of ARAC. 

Report | U.S. PIRG Education Fund

Recycling challenges vary across the country, but, overall, states are failing to both reduce unnecessary waste and adjust to a changing recycling landscape, according to a new study from U.S. PIRG Education Fund and Environment America Research & Policy Center. The State Of Recycling U.S. National Survey looks at programs in Illinois, Maryland, Minnesota, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Wisconsin, providing case studies and insight into specific issues that plague recycling efforts nationwide.

Budget

Following the Money 2019

Our 10th report on government spending transparency rates all 50 states on the degree to which they make information about corporate tax breaks and other subsidies available online.

 

Consumer Protection

Watch out for unsafe toys this holiday season

Our annual “Trouble in Toyland” report found toys with choking hazards, recalled toys still for sale, toxics in slime and more.

 

Antibiotics

Superbugs Unplugged: PIRG launches podcast about antibiotic resistance

Get ready for some alarming stories—and they're all the more alarming because they're true. On Nov. 14, U.S. PIRG and the Antibiotic Resistance Action Center (ARAC) of George Washington University launched "Superbugs Unplugged," a podcast that will dive into the alarming issue of rising antibiotic resistance.

 

Public Health

Ban Roundup

As cancer victims hold Monsanto accountable in court, governors should act to ban Roundup unless and until it's proven safe.

 
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Poll: Which of these positive changes do you most want to see in 2020?
More restaurant chains commit to stopping their overuse of antibiotics.
Stop using Roundup, which has been linked to cancer, on our parks and playgrounds.
Ban the worst single-use plastics.



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